06 December 2017

2017-18 GP

After finishing the previous post, 2017 Grand Prix, Palma de Mallorca, I added the latest Grand Prix series against the names of all 24 players on the World Chess Championship : Index of Players. The chart on the left lists the names of those players along with the number of points they scored over the three events (of four total) in which they competed.

As you might expect, the 24 players were already listed on the 'Index of Players'. For GMs Hammer and Rapport, it was only their second appearance in a World Championship event, and for GM Riazantsev it was his third.

My page on the 2017 Grand Prix shows that GMs Mamedyarov and Grischuk qualified into the forthcoming 2018 Candidates Tournament (congratulations to both!), while the chart on this post shows how close was the race in terms of points scored.

The 2017 GP, the fourth such series of events to be authorized by FIDE, was the first to start after the previous cycle had finished and the first to take place in a single calendar year. For the wrapup post on the Grand Prix for the previous cycle, see 2014-15 GP (June 2015).

29 November 2017

2017 Grand Prix, Palma de Mallorca

I added the crosstable for the Palma de Mallorca event to my page on the 2017 Grand Prix. Since this was the fourth and last leg of the Grand Prix for the current cycle -- see 2017 Grand Prix, Geneva (July 2017) for the third leg -- I also added the final, overall standings to the same page. Those standings were taken from the official site, FIDE World Chess Grand Prix 2017 (worldchess.com).

Next step: Add the names of all players to the pages comprising the World Chess Championship : Index of Players. Also, create a wrapup chart comparing the total game scores for the players, like I did for the previous cycle in 2014-15 GP (June 2015).

22 November 2017

2017 FIDE Congress : Whither the World Championship?

After yesterday's post on my other blog, Spectating the 88th FIDE Congress, I'll use this first follow-up to look at the future of my favorite chess subject, the World Championship. In last year's post 2016 FIDE Congress : Whither the World Championship? (January 2017), we learned about Agon's plans for 2016-17, including the now-completed title match in New York. In this year's post, we'll learn about revenue streams, starting with the document 88th FIDE Congress; Executive Board meeting; Goynuk, Antalya, Turkey; 13-14 October 2017; Minutes (see the 'Spectating' post for links to documents and other background info):-
3.3. Agon Limited.

Annex 67 is Draft FIDE Live Moves Broadcasting Policy.

Mr. Merenzon made a video presentation of his company's activities.

Mr. Bond said he was trying to reconcile the fervor expressed at the Verification Commission with this brave new world and promise of gold. He said indeed Agon was making great new strides. At the same time we do not see money coming in and this is distress for FIDE.

Mr. Gelfer said he was the one among the others, mainly the Treasurer and the Executive Director who were worried about this situation. We had lived through several difficult years, and Agon was recovering from bad heritage, there was not enough financial means and FIDE was struggling very hard and some of us were close to lose patience. In spite of this, in the last five or six years, we received close to 5 million USD or Euro from all events, from Agon. Most of the time the money were received late. We live in quite difficult neighborhood, chess is not an easy game to collect money for, we have very few assets to sell and sometimes the situation is unbearable in a simple business world. This is the situation here.

Taking each of those four talking points in reverse order, that last paragraph was the start of a long discussion on payments from Agon to FIDE. I won't copy the rest of the text here, because it is too long. I'm not sure whether it is interesting for most people, but it was certainly interesting for me. The previous paragraph, on the Verification Commission, was a new subject for me. I can't recall looking at this commission before and I wasn't sure what its responsibilities are. The FIDE Handbook ('Chapter 08 - The Commissions of FIDE') says the commission's first objective is:-

To verify the annual accounts and the financial statements prepared by the Treasurer, review the external audit report and make recommendations.

Its current activities were covered in two annexes issued after the Congress:-

6. Verification Commission's report. [July 2017]
87. Verification Commission meeting minutes. [October 2017]

Quoting from the minutes of October 2017:-

The Chairman proceeded to summarise the Commission's report [of July 2017]. A lengthy discussion ensued on the performance of Agon under the terms of its contract with FIDE of 22 February 2012. There were several expressions of concern that the performance of Agon was not satisfactory, that it was not discharging its responsibilities under the contract, and that it was contributing to the financial challenges of FIDE

From this we can better understand the concern of the Executive Board and the ensuing long discussion. As for [Ilya] Merenzon's video presentation, I'm sure it would be worth watching, but I doubt it will be made available to the general public. The first/last point, Annex 67, is perhaps the most important for the future of the World Championship:-

To: Members of the Working Group to Study the Proposal of Agon Limited on Protection of Live Chess Moves [...] The Draft Policy recognizes the right of the World Chess Federation to control the live dissemination of the FIDE events' moves. Furthermore, it provides for the measures to be taken against persons interfering with this right. [...] Sincerely, Matvey Shekhovtsov

We've already seen Shekhovtsov once on this blog in 2016 Candidates, Moscow (November 2015), regarding a 'change in the Agon/FIDE interface team' (Andrew Paulson out, Merenzon & Shekhovtsov in). We've also seen the subject of the draft in World Championship Bullying (November 2016). It's not clear to me how FIDE expects to contravene well-established copyright law with an internal procedure, so I'm certain we haven't seen the last of this topic.

As for other Executive Board topics related to the World Championship, two of the most important were mentioned at the beginning of the minutes.

1.1. Report of the Deputy President [G. Makropoulos].

Then we had Women's World Championship in Tehran. You remember that we faced a lot of criticism because we organized the Women Championship in Tehran, because of the problem for non-Muslims, I can say, for hijab. On this, I will tell you my personal opinion that I believe is really the opinion of most of the people in FIDE. We should support the traditions of the different communities that we have in FIDE. We are one family. [...]

In FIDE Grand Prix, we have introduced a completely new format that we will wait to see, to evaluate the whole cycle after the last tournament that we have in November. We believe that the idea is good with these Swiss tournaments. We'll see how the final results would be, and we will come back, of course, here to discuss if we will continue this system if we think that was success or we will have to make changes.

I covered the first topic in a pair of posts, Hijab Hubbub and Hijab Hubris (both October 2016), after the controversy caught the attention of the mainstream media. I last covered the second topic in Grand Prix Boycott (August 2017), after the series of events were caught up in Agon's continuing attempts to control the live dissemination of moves. The Executive Board also discussed the current plans for future events.

4.21. Commission on World Championship and Olympiads [WCOC].

4.21.2. FIDE World Cup 2019. • The event shall be held in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia, Dates to be provided. Mr. Freeman said we have not finalised the contract with them.

4.21.3. FIDE World Championship Match 2018. • Mr. Gelfer said the dates and possible venue are know and we are waiting for the challenger. Agon is planning to do this in London and they are working there. WCOC at its meeting Mr. Makropoulos asked them not to make a formal announcement till all is finalised, including the prize fund.

4.21.4. FIDE Candidates' Tournament 2018. • Mr. Freeman said some of the participants are known, the rest will be decided eventually. It will be held in March 2018 in Berlin, Germany.

4.21.5. FIDE Grand Prix series 2017. • Mr. Merenzon showed a quick update on the series.

4.21.6. FIDE Women's Grand Prix series. • Mr. G. Borg said as reported in WCOC meeting, there are three host countries in the stage of negotiations. We have qualification for the world Championship match in November 2019. This means the cycle will slip into 2018 also. Hopefully in the next two or three months we will get a full picture. [...]

4.21.7. FIDE Women's World Championship Match 2018. • The event will be moved to the beginning of 2018. The Chinese Chess Association confirmed the organization of the match and will advise on the venue. [...]

4.21.8. FIDE Women's World Championship 2018. • The event has been awarded to Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. [...]

That last event, the Women's World Championship 2018, is a knockout event. I bet most observers have long forgotten FIDE's reasons for treating it as a title tournament instead of as a qualifying event to a title match, like their other event with a knockout format, the World Cup. Both knockout tournaments will be held in Khanty-Mansiysk.

15 November 2017

2018 Candidates, Berlin

I added a new page for the 2018 Candidates Tournament, to be held in Berlin, and included it on my index page for the World Chess Championship. The eight-player tournament, to determine a challenger for the next World Championship title match, is scheduled for March next year.

As for the title match, it is currently scheduled on the FIDE calendar for 9-28 November 2018. According to World Chess Championship 2018 in London? (chessdom.com), from early last month,

The World Chess Championship 2018 is going to take place in London. This is what the renowned Spanish journalist Leontxo Garcia writes for the chess section of El Pais, quoting two “close sources” to the organization of the match. [...] Agon says the decision is not official and other venues are still possible.

Earlier this year we learned,

Oslo has been dumped as a potential host city for the next World Chess Championship, with its arranger and the Norwegian government arguing over the reason why. (newsinenglish.no)

See World Championship, Oslo 2018 (June 2017) on this blog for the announcement by Agon.

08 November 2017

C28 Zonal Qualification Paths

In the previous post, C28 Other Zonal Clippings, I wrote, 'Next step: Add a page showing the Qualification Paths (QP) for all players in the 2017 World Cup.' This is now available in Zonal Qualifiers 2016-2017 (C28). I also added links for this page to the zonal index, World Chess Championship Zonals, and to the cycle clippings, Zonals 2016-2017 (C28).

Next step: The roadmap for the documentation of the cycle, Notes on C06, C07, C27, and C28 (May 2017), lists two more steps that were done for the previous cycle:-

  • 2016-01-27: C27 Zonal Rating Reports
  • 2016-02-03: C27 Zonal Links

I can do this when all of the reports are available in the FIDE ratings database. Before I check their availability, I have a number of other tasks to do.

01 November 2017

C28 Other Zonal Clippings

In the previous post, C28 Zonal Clippings TWIC, I wrote,
For the five qualification events remaining to be documented, preliminary info was given in C28 Zonals (September 2017). I'll add the documentation for those five as soon as I can.

That's now done with all continental championships, zonals, and related events for the current cycle accounted for and documented on the page Zonals 2016-2017 (C28).

Next step: Add a page showing the Qualification Paths (QP) for all players in the 2017 World Cup (see the previous cycle, C27: Zonal Qualifiers 2014-2015, for an example). The preliminary work for the new page was done in C28 Regulations for World Cup Qualifiers.

25 October 2017

C28 Zonal Clippings TWIC

Continuing with last weeek's post, C28 Zonal Clippings 2016, I added another 21 clippings to the page documenting the Zonals 2016-2017 (C28). These covered 19 zonals played in 2016-2017 (the Baltic zonal consisted of three events), making a total of 22 zonals covered over the past two years by Mark Crowther's The Week in Chess (TWIC), an indispensable tool for any chess historian. For the five qualification events remaining to be documented, preliminary info was given in C28 Zonals (September 2017). I'll add the documentation for those five as soon as I can.